Vandalia Native
cinematographer/director of photography Collin Brazie  Film at Neon

 This film will get its local premiere Saturday, May 7 at The Neon, Dayton’s premier venue for independent film.Unfolding over the span of 36 hours in three separate wars – The American Civil War, World War I, and Iraq – FOXHOLE follows five soldiers confined in a foxhole as they grapple with morality, futility, and an increasingly volatile combat situation.
Written and directed by Jack Fessenden and shot pre-pandemic in upstate New York in the summer of 2019, the film premiered last September at Germany’s Oldenburg Film Festival and received the Ultra Indie Award for Best Film last October at the Woodstock Film Festival. In its coverage of Oldenburg, the Hollywood Reporter praised Brazie’s contributions stating, “DP Collin Brazie gives each segment a distinct, era-appropriate look, making the most of a clearly tiny budget.”
– excerpt from Russell Florence Jr’s story in the Dayton Daily News.  Full story here.

Local Producer Talks About “Redlining: Mapping in Inequality in Dayton and Springfield”

Filmmaker Selena Burks-Rentschler is an Ohio filmmaker, writer and director and last semester taught in the motion pictures program at Wright State University. She’s just wrapped a project where she served as the Associate Producer of Redlining: Mapping Inequality in Dayton and Springfield a documentary that debuts this month on Think TV.  This one-hour documentary tells the story of local families who were impacted by redlining, and the lasting effects of this federal policy on our region. It also makes some surprising discoveries about the roots of redlining that trace back to our region, and some larger-than-life personalities who have been all but forgotten.  recently took time to answer some questions about her involvement with this project.

 

D937: How did you become involved in this project?
SBR: Gloria Skurski, the Chief Education Officer over at ThinkTV, invited me to apply for an associate producer position on a documentary about redlining in Dayton and Springfield. She read Richard Rothstein’s book, The Color of Law, and was inspired to make a documentary about the long term ramifications the federal policy of redlining had on the region. I later met with the film’s producer, Richard Wonderling and the three of us had a conversation on the importance to tell a local story, to not only discuss the challenges, but to also show the resiliancy of the communities who’ve been adversely impacted by redlining and other forms of housing discrimination.
We were all on the same page and that was incredibly valuable.  I lived in redline communities as a child.  And I remember not being able to wrap my mind around the reasons why my neighborhood didn’t have access to certain amenities such as grocery stores, doctors offices or banks. I knew something was wrong but I didn’t have the knowledge or vocabulary to describe what it was until I became apart of the production team.

 

 

D937: What do you learn from working on it?

Mrs. Lelia Francis

SBR: One of the first things I did was read Rothstein’s The Color of Law, it was required reading and rightly so. There was a distinction made between De Facto segregation and De Jure segregation. And redlining was government sponsored segregation.

When I studied the maps from University of Richmond’s Mapping Inequality website, and read detailed descriptions I was floored by the verbiage used to describe immigrants, people of color, and specifically African Americans. There’s so much I learned from working on this documentary, too much to say here. But I will say I learned about some of the local civil rights activists and heroes from the 1950s, 60s and 70s. Most notably, Mrs. Lelia Francis. She was the first Black woman real estate agent in the nation and the first Black real estate agent in the state of Ohio. Not only that, she owned a successful real estate business with her husband and was one of the founders of Dayton’s first Black owned and operated bank, Unity State Bank.

 

D937: Why should people watch this? 
SBR: Our goal with this documentary was to inform, educate and create a space for dialogue around the discussion of our country’s history. When one group suffers, we all pay the price. In order to address the issues of racial disparities in health, education, economics and housing, we must understand how we arrived here. And as I’ve said before, knowledge is power. It’s essential to unpack the legacy redlining has had on the Miami Valley region because what happened here has happened in every major city across America. This documentary lays bare the government’s role in mapping our segregated cities and suburbs, which left many Black Americans with little to no options on ways to access the American Dream.

 

Airdates for the documentary are:

Thursday February 24, at 9pm on ThinkTV16
Sunday, February 27, 1:00pm on ThinkTV16


World Class Production Studios Coming to Dayton!

1913 Studios announces the purchase of 721 Springfield Street in Dayton, Ohio. The 210,000 square foot building will house three large production spaces, more than 60 offices and pre/post production support spaces that will support the next generation of cutting edge filming and media production. Construction is slated to begin in the first quarter of 2022.

“1913 Studios is excited to make this commitment to Dayton,” Joey DiFranco, co-founder of 1913 Studios. “This city has incredible infrastructure and a talent pipeline in terms of technology, media production, and the arts. We are looking forward to building our company headquarters here.”

Over the past year, 1913 Studios has been in conversations with organizations such as the City of Dayton, Montgomery County, FilmDayton, the Dayton Development Coalition, JobsOhio, and others as they refined their vision for the space. The facility will be a vertically integrated production studio that includes development, production, and editing suites all under one roof.

“We’ve worked hard to cultivate Montgomery County into a business-friendly area, and we’re excited that 1913 Studios has chosen to build here,” said Montgomery County Commissioner Judy Dodge. “This new, high-tech company is adding to our already diverse economy, and the content produced here will put the Dayton region on the map for media production.”

DiFranco and his 1913 Studios co-founder Seth Hummel both call the region home. DiFranco, a graduate of the Savannah College of Art and Design, returned to Dayton in 2019. Hummel, who completed post graduate studies at MIT, is a Dayton native and lifelong resident who has started and grown a number of businesses in the region. “Dayton has a well known history of innovators who have created industry leading technologies. We plan to continue that tradition by cementing this city and 1913 Studios as the premier multimedia production center of the Midwest,” said Hummel.

“This project is such a creative way to breathe new life into a space,” said Maranda Camden, business development manager with Wilcon, the Dayton-based general contractor on the project. “The way 1913 Studios will creatively reuse this massive space underscores their commitment to Dayton. Wilcon is thrilled to be part of this long-term vision and energy that will be concentrated here.”

Rounding out the project team is the Dayton-based architecture firm MODA4.

“Dayton’s architecture and building stock provides so many development opportunities,” said Jamie Owens, Director of Business Development at MODA4. “Having spent years working on The Arcade, we can’t wait to dig into another large project that demonstrates what can happen when a building is creatively modified with aesthetics and technology befitting the 21st century.”

 

ABOUT 1913 STUDIOS: 1913 Studios will be home to a state-of-the-art production facility supporting technology, content development, gaming development, media production and the arts in Dayton, Ohio, a region that embraces opportunity and is supportive of rapid growth.

According to Dayton Regional Film Commissioner Lisa Grigsby, ” 1913 Studios are going to be a game changer for the film industry in Dayton.  Bringing new jobs, internship opportunities and National attention to the students of the Tom Hanks Motion Picture School at Wright State University, FilmDayton knows that the playing field in Dayton just got bigger and we are ready to take on the challenge.”

 

 

Join us in celebrating Julia Reichert!

Get your tickets now!

 

 

 

Netflix films Dave Chappelle Promo with Assistance from FilmDayton spent over $50,000 on hotels, catering, hiring local crew, including drone operators.

 

 

A full-length documentary film from Academy Award-winning directors Julia Reichert and Steven Bognar.

Dayton Premiere of 9to5 – The Story of a Movement Thurs, 10/22 at Dixie Drive -In

In the early 1970s, a group of secretaries in Boston decided that they had suffered in silence long enough. They started fighting back, creating a movement to force changes in their workplaces. This movement became national, and is a largely forgotten story of U.S. twentieth century history. It encapsulates a unique intersection of the women’s movement with the labor movement. The awareness these secretaries brought to bear on women’s work reverberates even today. Clericals were the low-wage workers of their era. America now confronts the growing reality of deep income inequality.

Online Ticket Sales here.

FilmDayton Moving!

We’ve got a new home at the Dayton Mall!
Located on the 2nd floor near JC Penney’s, our new space will host Film Connections and be available for our members to use for castings, table reads, small screenings and classes!

Recent Graduate Steps into the Workforce: Lauren Whitinger

Big thanks to  Lauren Amber Whitinger, an intern who worked with us in May from the Modern College of Design.  She helped us update some graphics, member info and had a chance to work on set with Chase Crawford on film being made in Cincinnati.

 

 

A full-length documentary film from Academy Award-winning directors Julia Reichert and Steven Bognar.

Dayton Premiere of 9to5 – The Story of a Movement Thurs, 10/22 at Dixie Drive -In

In the early 1970s, a group of secretaries in Boston decided that they had suffered in silence long enough. They started fighting back, creating a movement to force changes in their workplaces. This movement became national, and is a largely forgotten story of U.S. twentieth century history. It encapsulates a unique intersection of the women’s movement with the labor movement. The awareness these secretaries brought to bear on women’s work reverberates even today. Clericals were the low-wage workers of their era. America now confronts the growing reality of deep income inequality.

Online Ticket Sales here.
IMG_0254
9to5
92nd Academy Awards – Press Room

Congrats to Jeff Reichert, Julia Reichert, Steve Bognar on their Academy Award for American Factory!

‘American Factory’: Meet the Filmmakers Behind the Oscar-Nominated Doc

Rolling Stone Jan 30, 2020

 

Obamas’ Production Company Wins First Oscar With ‘American Factory’

Variety Feb 9, 2020

 

From China, ‘American Factory’ Subject Chairman Cao Congratulates Film’s Directors on Oscar Win

IndieWire Feb 10, 2020

REGIONALLY CONNECTED FILMS
Untitled-2
OLD MAN AND THE GUN

A crime drama starring Robert Redford and Casey Afflack.

FilmDayton_Website_MilesAhead_Movie_RegionallyConnected_Films
MILES AHEAD

An exploration of the life & music of Miles Davis.

FilmDayton_Website_Goat_RegionallyConnected_Films
GOAT

Fraternity drama produced by James Franco and starring Nick Jonas.

FilmDayton_Websit_ClapperIcon

CASTING CALL FOR SHORT FILM RIVERA

FILMING DATES:  June 1st, 2nd & 3rd.

FilmDayton_Website_LocationIcon

FilmDayton is pleased to present a locations database to better serve the needs of filmmakers looking to use the backdrop of the Miami Valley for productions.

FilmDayton_Website_FilmCameraIcon

The following resources are provided as courtesy. FilmDayton in no way endorses these vendors, we just are aware they have been engaged in local film endeavors.

MOTION PICTURE TAX CREDIT

As of July 1, 2016 there’s $40 million in Ohio rebates available!

All Eligible Expenditures will be Credited at 30%

CONTACT

FILM DAYTON

Mailing Address: 25 Villa Pointe Drive

Springboro, OH 45066

Dayton, OH 45402

937.554.0031

Lisa@FilmDayton.com

SUPPORT FILM DAYTON

UPCOMING EVENTS

 February Film Connections

Wed, Feb 20th 7-9pm at Wiley’s Comedy Club in the Oregon District

It’s FREE for FilmDayton members, $5 for guests & non-members.

Local Producer Talks About “Redlining: Mapping in Inequality in Dayton and Springfield”

Filmmaker Selena Burks-Rentschler is an Ohio filmmaker, writer and director and last semester taught in the motion pictures program at Wright State University. She’s just wrapped a project where she served as the Associate Producer of Redlining: Mapping Inequality in Dayton and Springfield a documentary that debuts this month on Think TV.  This one-hour documentary tells the story of local families who were impacted by redlining, and the lasting effects of this federal policy on our region. It also makes some surprising discoveries about the roots of redlining that trace back to our region, and some larger-than-life personalities who have been all but forgotten.  recently took time to answer some questions about her involvement with this project.

 

D937: How did you become involved in this project?
SBR: Gloria Skurski, the Chief Education Officer over at ThinkTV, invited me to apply for an associate producer position on a documentary about redlining in Dayton and Springfield. She read Richard Rothstein’s book, The Color of Law, and was inspired to make a documentary about the long term ramifications the federal policy of redlining had on the region. I later met with the film’s producer, Richard Wonderling and the three of us had a conversation on the importance to tell a local story, to not only discuss the challenges, but to also show the resiliancy of the communities who’ve been adversely impacted by redlining and other forms of housing discrimination.
We were all on the same page and that was incredibly valuable.  I lived in redline communities as a child.  And I remember not being able to wrap my mind around the reasons why my neighborhood didn’t have access to certain amenities such as grocery stores, doctors offices or banks. I knew something was wrong but I didn’t have the knowledge or vocabulary to describe what it was until I became apart of the production team.

 

 

D937: What do you learn from working on it?

Mrs. Lelia Francis

SBR: One of the first things I did was read Rothstein’s The Color of Law, it was required reading and rightly so. There was a distinction made between De Facto segregation and De Jure segregation. And redlining was government sponsored segregation.

When I studied the maps from University of Richmond’s Mapping Inequality website, and read detailed descriptions I was floored by the verbiage used to describe immigrants, people of color, and specifically African Americans. There’s so much I learned from working on this documentary, too much to say here. But I will say I learned about some of the local civil rights activists and heroes from the 1950s, 60s and 70s. Most notably, Mrs. Lelia Francis. She was the first Black woman real estate agent in the nation and the first Black real estate agent in the state of Ohio. Not only that, she owned a successful real estate business with her husband and was one of the founders of Dayton’s first Black owned and operated bank, Unity State Bank.


D937: Why should people watch this? 
SBR: Our goal with this documentary was to inform, educate and create a space for dialogue around the discussion of our country’s history. When one group suffers, we all pay the price. In order to address the issues of racial disparities in health, education, economics and housing, we must understand how we arrived here. And as I’ve said before, knowledge is power. It’s essential to unpack the legacy redlining has had on the Miami Valley region because what happened here has happened in every major city across America. This documentary lays bare the government’s role in mapping our segregated cities and suburbs, which left many Black Americans with little to no options on ways to access the American Dream.

 

Airdates for the documentary are:

Thursday February 24, at 9pm on ThinkTV16
Sunday, February 27, 1:00pm on ThinkTV16


Attend A Table Read for A Midsummer’s Night Dream

Join local filmmaker Shaunn Baker on April 25th at 7pm at The Loft Theatre as professional actors read through the script for his upcoming movie. Reserve your free seat here.

The adaptation is set in Appalachia during the 1800s, and uses Appalachian dialect with the original Shakespearean verse.

“Shakespeare’s words performed with this dialect are really beautiful, as it turns out,” said local filmmaker Shaunn Baker who adapted the screenplay and is working to get the script produced as a feature film. “It’s a rougher sound, closer to the Old English the play would have been performed in originally. A very different experience from hearing the story in the more traditional ‘heightened’ dialect we typically associate with Shakespeare. My hope is that the roughness of the Appalachian culture and accent will make this adaptation much more accessible to contemporary audiences.”
This project is generously supported (in part) through an Artist Opportunity Grant funded by the Montgomery County Arts & Cultural District and administered by Culture Works.

Table Read for A Midsummer’s Night Dream

You’re invited to join local filmmaker Shaunn Baker at a table read on April 25th at 7pm at The Loft Theatre.
Reserve your free seat here.

The adaptation is set in Appalachia during the 1800s, and uses Appalachian dialect with the original Shakespearean verse.

“Shakespeare’s words performed with this dialect are really beautiful, as it turns out,” said local filmmaker Shaunn Baker who adapted the screenplay and is working to get the script produced as a feature film. “It’s a rougher sound, closer to the Old English the play would have been performed in originally. A very different experience from hearing the story in the more traditional ‘heightened’ dialect we typically associate with Shakespeare. My hope is that the roughness of the Appalachian culture and accent will make this adaptation much more accessible to contemporary audiences.”
This project is generously supported (in part) through an Artist Opportunity Grant funded by the Montgomery County Arts & Cultural District and administered by Culture Works.

 

 

https://planned2give.networkforgood.com/events/42285-table-read-for-a-midsummer-s-night-dream